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What is the latest on employees’ rights in the event of redundancy in France?

Dismissing an employee due to economic difficulties is extremely delicate in France. A law dated 8th August 2016 has specified the definition of the economic grounds for dismissals, providing that economic difficulties are, in particular, characterized by a significant evolution of an indicator such as a significant drop of turnover, a significant drop in purchase … Continue reading

The necessity of adopting a sensitive consultation process in the event of redundancy

This post was contributed by Jahan Meeran, Trainee Solicitor, Norton Rose Fulbright LLP, London A recent decision of the Employment Appeal Tribunal (EAT) illustrates the pitfalls of not adopting a sensitive consultation process in the event of redundancy.. In the case, the claimant had been employed by the property management division of his employer for … Continue reading

When an employer hides another employer

Dual employment is a sensitive subject in French employment law as it enables employees to raise claims against a different employer from that with which the employment contract was signed. The matrix-type organisation of groups of companies, which has become the rule, can have adverse consequences if employees have the feeling that they are employed … Continue reading

Financial Sector – Conduct and Regulatory References

On 7 March 2017, one year after the implementation of the Senior Managers and Certification Regime (SM&CR) which was introduced to improve accountability in the financial services sector, two further requirements have come into effect: The regulatory reference requirements; and the rolling out of the Conduct Rules to a wider range of employees. Regulatory references … Continue reading

Changes to the Working Conditions Act – expected to come into force 1 July 2017

Proposed changes to the current Working Conditions Act (Arbeidsomstandighedenwet) (the Act) are expected to have a direct impact on all companies in the Netherlands. The changes will mainly impact on the current relationship with the occupational health & safety service provider (Arbodienstverlener); existing policies in relation to sickness prevention; and conditions that apply to the … Continue reading

Update regarding protection against religion-based discrimination in France

In France, the issue of religious behavior in the workplace is extremely sensitive. The principle under French employment law is that while public sector employers are required to enforce a policy of strict neutrality, in private sector companies, a balance must be maintained between the principle of secularism and the prohibition of discrimination based on … Continue reading

New protection of French whistleblowers under the Sapin II Law

Much attention was focused recently on President Obama’s decision, in the final days of his presidency, on commuting the sentence of Chelsea Manning, who provided certain classified information to WikiLeaks. In France, new legislation has recently been passed and implemented harmonizing the protection of whistleblowing employees (https://www.legifrance.gouv.fr/affichTexte.do;jsessionid=4BBFD240827AF0FD9A6340FF254E6F1B.tpdila21v_3?cidTexte=JORFTEXT000033558528&categorieLien=id). Who is concerned? Under the new regulation, whistleblowers … Continue reading

Key French employment law developments in 2017

As 2017 is a Presidential election year in France, we do not expect major changes in employment legislation to occur in France in the near future.  However, this does not mean that French employment lawyers will be unoccupied. First and foremost, the El Khomri law (dated 8 August 2016), which significantly modified the employment law … Continue reading

Geplantes Entgelttransparenzgesetz

Mit dem geplanten Entgelttransparenzgesetz will die Bundesregierung Lohnunterschiede zwischen Frauen und Männern abschaffen. Durchschnittlich ist die Vergütung von Frauen in gleichwertigen Positionen 7 Prozent niedriger als die von Männern. Dieser sogenannte „Gender Pay Gap“ soll mit dem am 11. Januar 2017 vom Bundeskabinett beschlossenen „Gesetz zur Förderung der Transparenz von Entgeltstrukturen“ bekämpft werden. Mehr zum … Continue reading

Class action against workplace discrimination

In France, employees who suffer from workplace discrimination are entitled to bring claims against their employer. Workplace discrimination is strictly prohibited and is characterized when a person is treated less favorably than another because of his or her origin, sex, marital status, pregnancy, physical appearance, health, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, political opinions, trade … Continue reading

Italy’s Supreme Court confirms that dismissals for redundancy to increase profits are legal

In a decision dated December 7, 2016, Italy’s Supreme Court – the Corte di Cassazione – confirmed that the dismissal of an individual employee for redundancy can be legally grounded solely on business-related reasons, such as improving the company’s competitiveness, reducing costs, or increasing profits. The decision was based on the constitutional principle of “freedom … Continue reading

Recent changes to the law on the dismissal of severely disabled employees

In Germany, as of 1 January 2017, various amendments to the law on severely disabled persons came into force. Of particular importance is a new regulation relating to the dismissal of severely disabled employees. Until the recent changes came into force, before the dismissal of a severely disabled employee the representative body for severely disabled … Continue reading

The new French “right to disconnect”

French law has recently implemented the “right to disconnect” from digital tools, requiring employers to limit employees’ use of digital tools outside of office hours. The purpose of the new legislation is to protect the employees’ work-life balance and their right to rest periods. New article L 2242-8 of the French Labour Code provides that … Continue reading

Intra-Corporate Transfer Directive implemented in the Netherlands

On November 29, 2016 the Dutch Royal Decree (the Decree) which implements the European Intra-Corporate Transfer Directive (2014/66/EU) (the Directive), came into force. The Directive applies to secondments of non-EU citizens satisfying certain conditions whose main place of residence is outside the EU (Expats) to an EU Member State. The Directive simplifies the admission procedure … Continue reading

What rights do workers have to rest breaks in France?

French regulations strictly supervise employees’ working time, which may not exceed a certain limit and must include break time and minimum rest periods. Not only must the employer comply with these obligations, but in the event of litigation, the employer must be in a position to produce evidence that it has done so. Each employee … Continue reading

What rights do workers have to rest breaks in Germany?

This post was also contributed by Sebastian Kutzner, Trainee, Norton Rose Fulbright LLP (Munich). Due to increasing demands for a work life balance, uncertainty as to employees’ rights to rest periods, in particular, is widespread. German law distinguishes between two types of rest periods: Rest breaks (to be granted during working time); and Resting time … Continue reading

Gender Pay Gap Reporting Regulations

The Government has published the revised draft of the Gender Pay Gap Information Regulations which are due to come into force in April 2017. Whilst the revised regulations do clarify some of the issues raised in the previous draft in February there are still some points on which further guidance is needed. Which employees are … Continue reading

What rights do workers have to rest breaks in the UK?

The Working Time Regulations 1998 (the Regulations), which implement the requirements of the 1993 EC Working Time Directive, introduced restrictions on the number of hours worked by employees and workers together with a right to rest breaks, rest periods and holidays. This post is concerned with the right to rest breaks during the working day. … Continue reading

Employee, worker or self-employed?

In UK employment law a person’s employment status determines both their rights and responsibilities. An individual can be an employee, a worker or self-employed.  Whilst traditionally individuals were employees or self-employed there has been a significant rise in “worker” status.  The recent reported case of Aslam and others v Uber BV considered whether drivers had … Continue reading

Judgment on the qualification of a “payroll company” and a “temporary agency contract”

On 4 November 2016, the Supreme Court in the Netherlands issued an important judgment  that will impact on the use of payroll companies. In this judgment, the Supreme Court held that no “allocation function” is needed to qualify as a temporary employment agency contract (uitzendovereenkomst). This e-Alert provides a summary of the judgment and further background … Continue reading

Brexit : employment law – parliamentary briefing paper

On 10 November 2016,  the UK Parliament published a Briefing Paper setting out the Government’s position in relation to employment rights of workers following the UK’s exit from the EU.  Whilst the Government may believe that the Briefing Paper clearly sets out its position, on closer analysis it seems to raise more questions than it … Continue reading

An employee alleging harassment at work cannot be the object of a claim for defamation by the employer

In France, employees alleging harassment enjoy legal protection against any retaliation by their employer. The employee cannot be made subject to sanctions as a consequence of such allegations, whether by outright dismissal or some lesser sanction. Obviously, there are some caveats around this, including the requirement that the employee have made such allegation of harassment … Continue reading
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