Tag archives: Dismissal

Human resources managers can be indirectly liable for harassment

Health and safety of employees is highly protected in France. Employers are  responsible for the prevention of any damage to their employees’ health and safety resulting from their work. Amongst other things, French law requires employers to ensure that their employees are protected from any harassment at work. But another provision of the French Employment … Continue reading

Signed on the Dotted Line in Time? The Court of Appeal addresses the timing of an employee’s execution of her employment contract.

Employers have long been advised to ensure that a new employee agrees to and executes his or her written employment contract before starting work. Otherwise, there is a risk that the employment contract will be held to be unenforceable on the basis that there was no “consideration” provided to the employee in exchange for entering … Continue reading

What is the latest on employees’ rights in the event of redundancy in France?

Dismissing an employee due to economic difficulties is extremely delicate in France. A law dated 8th August 2016 has specified the definition of the economic grounds for dismissals, providing that economic difficulties are, in particular, characterized by a significant evolution of an indicator such as a significant drop of turnover, a significant drop in purchase … Continue reading

Ontario Human Rights Tribunal: Subjective belief can trump facts

Chodha v. 1352866, 2016 HRTO 1241 demonstrates that human rights tribunals will consider an employer’s bona fide subjective belief in deciding whether the employer has provided a reasonable explanation for apparently discriminatory conduct. Indeed, the employer’s belief may take precedence over factual circumstances, as they did in this case. The case involved the termination of … Continue reading

When an employer hides another employer

Dual employment is a sensitive subject in French employment law as it enables employees to raise claims against a different employer from that with which the employment contract was signed. The matrix-type organisation of groups of companies, which has become the rule, can have adverse consequences if employees have the feeling that they are employed … Continue reading

Update regarding protection against religion-based discrimination in France

In France, the issue of religious behavior in the workplace is extremely sensitive. The principle under French employment law is that while public sector employers are required to enforce a policy of strict neutrality, in private sector companies, a balance must be maintained between the principle of secularism and the prohibition of discrimination based on … Continue reading

Italy’s Supreme Court confirms that dismissals for redundancy to increase profits are legal

In a decision dated December 7, 2016, Italy’s Supreme Court – the Corte di Cassazione – confirmed that the dismissal of an individual employee for redundancy can be legally grounded solely on business-related reasons, such as improving the company’s competitiveness, reducing costs, or increasing profits. The decision was based on the constitutional principle of “freedom … Continue reading

Recent changes to the law on the dismissal of severely disabled employees

In Germany, as of 1 January 2017, various amendments to the law on severely disabled persons came into force. Of particular importance is a new regulation relating to the dismissal of severely disabled employees. Until the recent changes came into force, before the dismissal of a severely disabled employee the representative body for severely disabled … Continue reading

Constitutional Court takes a vehement stance against racism in the workplace

This article was written by Erwyn Durman, a Candidate Attorney at Norton Rose Fulbright South Africa Employers now have the authority to sanction serious cases of racism with a dismissal. The Constitutional Court by overturning contrary judgments of the Labour Court and the Labour Appeal Court: ruled categorically that a dismissal is an appropriate remedy for … Continue reading

The importance of mobility clauses for Quebec employers

In order to meet their organizational needs, employers may need to relocate their employees’ workplace. However, relocating employees can be risky business for employers. The place of work is an important part of an employee’s working conditions. When employers make substantial changes to their employees’ working conditions, said employees can potentially claim that their original … Continue reading

An employer’s financial circumstances do not affect the reasonable notice period

Should an employer’s financial circumstances be relevant when considering the period of reasonable notice to which a wrongfully dismissed employee is entitled? This question was raised on appeal in Michela v St. Thomas of Villanova Catholic School, 2015 ONCA 801. As calculating the appropriate notice period is fact-specific, the argument that an employer’s financial circumstances … Continue reading

Wilson v. AECL – Generosity is Not Enough: Federally Regulated Employers Must Have Cause to Dismiss Non-Unionized Employees

At common law, a non-unionized employee can be dismissed without reasons if he or she is given reasonable notice or pay in lieu.  Today, a majority of the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that this common law rule does not apply to federally regulated employers.  The Court ruled that federally regulated employers must always provide … Continue reading

“What are the latest developments on whistleblowing in the workplace in Germany?”

Apart from the well-known Wiki-leaks, recent prominent cases of whistleblowing such as Lux-leaks, the Panama Papers or the case of the German geriatric nurse Brigitte Heinisch, who was dismissed after revealing the ill-treatment of elderly people in a Berlin retirement home, continue to highlight the continued relevance of the topic “whistleblowing”. While this has resulted … Continue reading

Ontario Court Upholds Employment Agreement Provision that Limited Employee’s Notice of Termination to Statutory Minimum.

In Oudin v. Le Centre Francophone de Toronto, The Ontario Superior Court dismissed a motion for summary judgment brought by an employee who alleged that the termination provision in his employment agreement was unenforceable. This provision limited his entitlement to notice of termination to the minimum required by employment standards legislation. The court did find … Continue reading

The precious help of the occupational health physician in dismissal for disability procedures

As a general principle, the occupational health physician is a major interlocutor of the employer regarding the employees’ health and safety. In particular, there exists a very specific procedure under which employees’ disability must be acknowledged by the occupational health physician in order to authorize an employer to begin a dismissal procedure. However, such opinion of … Continue reading

Employers must immediately reinstate a dismissed employee when informed of her pregnancy

Pregnant employees benefit from specific and extensive guarantees against termination of their employment under French law. In particular, employers are not allowed to dismiss an employee from the moment she is medically certified as being pregnant, excepted in two limited cases: where the employee has committed an act of gross misconduct or if it is … Continue reading

The severe sanction applicable to provisions entitling employers to waive a non-compete clause at any time

French law allows an employer to subject an employee to a non-compete obligation after the termination of his/her employment under certain conditions. However, in practice, an employer may realize at the time of the termination that an employee will actually not be in a position to constitute a threat to its interests even if he/she … Continue reading

Altering Outdated Job Description & Constructive Dismissal

Constructive dismissal occurs when an employer substantially alters, without the employee’s consent, an essential term of the employee’s contract of employment. This can give rise to litigation and financial liability for an employer. However, for a unilateral change by an employer to constitute constructive dismissal, the change must be a fundamental one going to the … Continue reading

A lie in an employee’s resume may lead to a dismissal for gross misconduct

In any recruitment process, it is legitimate for employers to inquire as to the professional skills and experience of candidates for vacant positions. In order to avoid any excess actions on the employers’ part, French employment law provides that the information requested from any candidate may only serve the purpose of assessing his/her ability to … Continue reading

The results of an alcohol test do not justify a dismissal if based on unenforceable internal regulations

Under French employment law, the issue of alcohol consumption at the workplace is taken very seriously as it could entail significant risks, not only for the employee and his/her colleagues, but also for the company in general (loss of productivity, reputational risks, etc.). Moreover, the employer is bound by a duty of care towards its … Continue reading

The CFO of a parent company can validly dismiss employees of a subsidiary

French employment law mandates that it is the employer itself who must notify employees of their dismissal. In this context, and for obvious practical reasons, the employer is entitled to delegate the authority to sign the dismissal letter to another person. However, even though case law has long admitted that in certain situations the dismissal … Continue reading
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