All I want for Christmas is… some UK pensions reforms?

OK, so even I am not that obsessed with pensions, love it though I may. I’m also a realist about how long it may still take. But there’s no denying that pensions have been largely ignored recently with all the hoo-ha in the UK over Brexit and the general election. The Pension Schemes Bill died when Parliament dissolved for the election, and even that failed to deal with many of the burning issues of the day. But we have a new Government now, so what is on my Christmas wish list?

Allow trustees to invest for good

Pension trustees are now required to reveal their investment policy on climate change and good governance, but their actual investment powers are really rather limited when it comes to investing for the greater good. That’s because of the Cowan v Scargill case, where Arthur Scargill of the National Union of Mineworkers wanted the coal industry pension scheme to avoid investing in competitor fuels and overseas businesses. The court told the trustees to focus on investing to yield the best financial return for beneficiaries. That was in 1984 and nothing much has changed since.

It makes it tricky to invest in businesses designed to have a positive impact on society, but it is clear that MPs expect pension funds to be part of the move to climate-friendly investment. So, a thought – is it time for the Government to empower trustees to explore impact investment?

Get rid of tax obstacles

You can’t solve everything in one go, but surely we can solve the tax challenges on GMP equalisation? Equalisation of pension benefits as between men and women for the effect of unequal statutory guaranteed minimum pensions will lead to small back-payments and a few tweaks to benefits. It really isn’t going to be life-changing for most people. At most it might also lead to some benefit structure changes using GMP conversion. The trouble is that the current tax regime can’t cope with any of it and HMRC is struggling to react. And yet back in the summer the-then Pensions Minister was telling trustees to get on with equalisation. They will, as soon as the Government takes GMP equalisation changes outside the current tax restrictions.

While they’re at it, I’d also like HMRC to stop penalising split pension transfers. Losing tax protections if AVCs are transferred in one direction with main scheme benefits being left behind will block the consolidation of pensions that the Government was promoting, and potentially disadvantage members.

Relax on chair’s statements

Transparency on costs in defined contribution schemes is healthy and should be encouraged. But that doesn’t mean that the Pensions Regulator should have to fine trustees over small details in the annual trustee chair’s statement. The current enforcement law isn’t risk-based and it is not actually helping members. So I’d like to see the Regulator being given more discretion in policing chair statements, to use a scarce resource more efficiently.

Sort out GMP conversion

Back to my favourite topic. We have laws in place to allow employers to change the structure of pension schemes to get rid of the out-dated and discriminatory requirements which still apply to a proportion of many individuals’ pre-1997 pension benefits. However even the Department for Work and Pensions concedes they don’t quite work as drafted and was planning to make some changes. Please can we have them now? They weren’t in the 2019 Pension Schemes Bill, but I am crossing my fingers for them to appear when and if the Bill re-emerges.

And yes, I have been good*.

* For a given value and according to parameters I have determined as appropriate to the situation.

Update on electronic medical certificates

Medical certificates may not be ordered online

A recent decision of the Hamburg Regional Court (LG Hamburg 3.9.2019 – 406 HK O 56/19) has ruled that issuing medical certificates of incapacity by remote diagnosis is a violation of medical diligence. This means that employees will not be able to apply online for a medical certificate confirming their inability to work (as previously discussed in our blog article, Facilitating HR Management: Electronic medical certificates on 23rd September 2019).

According to the Professional Code of Conduct for Physicians, doctors must proceed with the necessary care when issuing medical reports and certificates and express their medical evaluation to the best of their knowledge. The Court confirmed that the severity of an illness and its influence on a person’s ability to perform a certain task in their employment cannot be reliably assessed by consultation with the patient by telephone or video call, but only by direct personal or physical examination. It is therefore inadmissible to issue medical certificates of incapacity without an in person consultation, even in the case of minor illnesses such as colds.

Implementation for electronic medical certificates

Further to our previous blog article, the electronic procedure for the submission of medical certificates of incapacity by doctors to health insurance funds is due to take effect from 1st January 2022, pursuant to the Third Bureaucracy Relief Act published on 28th November 2019. This procedure replaces the employee’s duty to submit a medical certificate to their employer, as employers will now be able to receive this information directly from the employee’s health insurance database.  This change was in response to the fact that manual transmission and processing of certificates of incapacity in paper form is no longer regarded as up-to-date, and should be replaced by more efficient digital communication channels. As compared to the original bill (which proposed an implementation date of 1st January 2021), employers will have an additional  year to take appropriate technical and organisational measures to ensure they are ready to implement the electronic procedure.

Gender pay gap: a new measuring tool

Since 1972, there have been numerous laws on professional equality between men and women but the gender pay gap remains a crucial issue which has not been resolved yet.

The parliament voted a new law on 5th September 2018 creating an index to be used to measure the gender pay gap in companies.

Since 1st January 2019, there has been an obligation to assess the gender pay gap in each company with at least 50 employees through the use of the index. The methodology adopted is to allocate a certain number of points based on the following criteria:

  • Comparison of average remuneration men/women per position and age range
  • Discrepancy in the rate of individual salary increases not corresponding to promotion
  • Discrepancy in the rate of promotion
  • Percentage of women having obtained a salary increase in the year of their return from maternity leave
  • Number of employees whose gender is under-represented amongst the 10 highest earners in the company

If the number of points obtained is below 75 points (out of 100), the company must remedy the situation and has 3 years to do so. The employer must try to agree measures with the unions during the annual negotiation. If no agreement with the unions has been found, the employer must establish an action plan and send it to the labour authorities.

The employer’s obligation is to obtain a positive result. If the score of the company remains below 75 points after 3 years, the employer will be obliged to pay a penalty of 1% of the total wages in the company.  However, if the employer can demonstrate its good faith and depending on the reasons for not succeeding, it can obtain from the Direccte (labour authorities) an additional one year to remedy.

There is also a duty of transparency through the obligation to publish the company’s results on its internet site every year. For companies of at least 1,000 employees: such obligation started on 1st March 2019, for those with between 251 and 999 employees it came into effect on 1st September 2019 and for companies with 50 to 250 employee, it will come into effect on 1st March 2020.

Some other actions are expected both in France and at the European Union level. In France, a new law is expected in 2020 regarding women’s economic empowerment through an increase of quotas in Boards of Directors and possibly in Executive Committees, as well as a law aiming at facilitating the return to work after a period of maternity leave.

At the European Union level, it is expected that the Equality Commissioner will propose measures in a “European Strategy for Gender Equality”, which will include binding measures on pay transparency, and a revival of the directive for a better gender balance in Boards of Directors.

 

 

France: Le harcèlement sexuel susceptible d’être exclu en cas d’attitude ambigüe de la victime

Le harcèlement sexuel est défini, dans le Code du travail, par « des propos ou comportements à connotation sexuelle répétés qui soit portent atteinte à [la] dignité [du salarié] en raison de leur caractère dégradant ou humiliant, soit créent à son encontre une situation intimidante, hostile ou offensante ».

Le Code du travail prévoit également une assimilation aux faits constitutifs de harcèlement pour « toute forme de pression grave, même non répétée, exercée dans le but réel ou apparent d’obtenir un acte de nature sexuelle, que celui-ci soit recherché au profit de l’auteur des faits ou au profit d’un tiers ».

Pourtant, le 25 septembre 2019, la Cour de cassation n’a pas reconnu le caractère de harcèlement sexuel pour les agissements d’un responsable hiérarchique, qui avait régulièrement envoyé, et ce sur une période de temps notable (plusieurs années consécutives), des messages au contenu déplacé et pornographique à l’une de ses subordonnées, par l’intermédiaire de son téléphone professionnel.

Les faits avaient été relatés par une tierce personne, dans un courrier envoyé à la direction de l’entreprise. Sur la base de ceux-ci, l’employeur avait licencié le responsable pour faute grave, qualifiant ces faits de harcèlement sexuel.

Le salarié avait par la suite contesté son licenciement. A l’appui de sa réclamation, il indiquait qu’une relation de séduction s’était effectivement installée entre sa subordonnée et lui, mais que c’était elle qui avait été à l’initiative des échanges de SMS, et qu’elle adoptait à son égard une attitude provocante. Il niait toute forme de pression exercée sur sa subordonnée, et prétendait que la relation (uniquement par messages interposée) qu’il avait entretenue avec sa subordonnée relevait de sa vie privée et ne pouvait justifier son licenciement.

Les faits étaient incontestables, de multiples preuves et attestations soutenaient la réalité des messages échangés.

Cependant, la Cour d’appel, puis la Cour de cassation, ont été sensibles à l’argumentation du salarié. En effet, les juges ont pris en compte l’attitude de la subordonnée pour écarter le harcèlement sexuel. Celle-ci avait en effet répondu aux messages de son responsable hiérarchique, entretenant dans une certaine mesure la correspondance avec lui, et sans jamais lui demander de cesser l’envoi des messages. Plusieurs salariés attestaient par ailleurs du fait que celle-ci adoptait à son égard « une attitude très familière de séduction ».

Les juges ont par conséquent écarté toute pression grave ou toute situation intimidante, hostile ou offensante à l’égard de la salariée qui avait volontairement participé à un jeu de séduction réciproque, ce qui excluait que les faits reprochés au salarié puissent être qualifiés de harcèlement sexuel.

Par cet arrêt, la Haute juridiction permet de rappeler que le harcèlement doit être « subi ». Les juges de la Cour d’appel avaient d’ailleurs souligné que l’employeur n’établissait nullement que la salariée avait fait part de sa volonté de voir cesser ce jeu de séduction.

Si les juges ont considéré que les faits n’étaient pas constitutifs de harcèlement sexuel, ils n’ont pour autant pas exonéré le salarié de toute responsabilité.

En effet, le licenciement (initialement prononcé pour faute grave par l’employeur) a été requalifié en licenciement pour cause réelle et sérieuse. La Cour d’appel a en effet considéré, soutenue par la Cour de cassation, que le salarié, exerçant les fonctions de responsable d’exploitation d’une entreprise comptant plus de cent personnes, avait adopté un comportement lui faisant perdre toute autorité et toute crédibilité dans l’exercice de sa fonction de direction et dès lors incompatible avec ses responsabilités.

France: Provocative acts do not necessarily fall within the scope of sexual harassment if the victim’s behaviour is ambiguous

The French employment Code defines sexual harassment as “repeated sexual comments or conduct that either violate the [employee’s] dignity because of their degrading or humiliating nature or create an intimidating, hostile or offensive situation against the employee“.

The French employment Code also assimilates to sexual harassment “any form of serious pressure, even non-repeated, exercised for the real or apparent purpose of obtaining an act of a sexual nature, whether it is sought for the benefit of the perpetrator or for the benefit of a third party“.

However, on 25 September 2019, the French Supreme Court (Cour de Cassation) did not acknowledge that a line manager, who had regularly sent, over a significant period of time (several consecutive years), messages with inappropriate and pornographic content to one of his subordinates, via his company smartphone, committed acts falling within the scope of sexual harassment.

The company had been informed of the facts by a letter sent to its management by a third party. On the basis of these, the employer dismissed the manager for serious misconduct (faute grave), qualifying his behavior towards his subordinate as sexual harassment.

The manager subsequently challenged his dismissal before the employment court. To support his claim, he indicated that a seductive relationship had developed between him and his subordinate, but that it was she who had initiated the SMS exchanges, and that she had adopted a provocative attitude towards him at work. He denied any form of pressure on his subordinate, and claimed that the relationship he had had with his subordinate was of a private nature and could not justify his dismissal.

The facts in this case were indisputable. Ample evidence of the existence of the exchanges, supported by testimony, proved the existence of the messages exchanged.

However, the Court of Appeal, and subsequently the French Supreme Court, were sensitive to the manager’s arguments. The judges took into account the subordinate’s attitude in order to refrain from qualifying the exchanges as falling within the offence of sexual harassment. The court explained its reasoning by pointing out that the subordinate had replied to the messages of her line manager, maintaining the correspondence with him to some extent, and never asking him to stop sending messages. Several employees also certified that she adopted “a very familiar attitude of seduction” towards him.

The judges therefore ruled out any serious pressure or any intimidating, hostile or offensive situation towards the subordinate who, according to them, had voluntarily participated in a game of mutual seduction. This meant that the acts alleged against the manager could not be qualified as sexual harassment.

By such decision, the Supreme Court recalled that harassment must be “suffered”. The judges of the court of appeal pointed out that the company did not provide any evidence that the subordinate had asked her manager to end such seduction game.

Even though in this case the court ruled out the existence of sexual harassment, the employee’s dismissal was still considered as valid.

French employment law makes an important distinction between “real and serious cause”, which justifies the dismissal of an employee but entitles the employee to a termination indemnity and certain other statutory payments, and dismissal for “serious misconduct”, which depending on the gravity of the alleged misconduct, justifies not only the dismissal in the first place but also the absence of some of these payments (in particular the termination indemnity and the notice period entitlement). In this case, although due to the lack of a finding of sexual harassment the court found that serious misconduct did not exist, the court still found that the behavior of the employee justified his dismissal for real and serious cause. The Court of appeal held, and the French Supreme Court affirmed, that the actions of the manager, who had a very senior role in a company employing more than one hundred employees, had adopted a course of behavior that caused him to lose all authority and credibility in the exercise of his management function and was therefore incompatible with his responsibilities.

Taking it a day at a time

Section 96 of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) (the Act) provides that “for each year of service with his or her employer, an employee [excluding casual employees] is entitled to 10 days of paid personal/carer’s leave”.  This entitlement accrues progressively during a year of service according to the employee’s ordinary hours of work and it accumulates from year to year.

What is a day?

In a recent case the Full Court of the Federal Court of Australia had to consider the meaning of “day” in section 96 of the Act.

The case related to a group of employees who worked 38 ordinary hours per week, but did so over 3 working days of 12 hours (plus unpaid break time).

In accruing for personal/carers leave the employer credited the employees with 76 hours of leave in each year of service.  Hence the employer acted on the basis that “day” in section 96 of the Act meant a notional day made up of 7.6 hours of work.  As a result the affected employees “used up” their annual accrual of leave after they had been absent from work for 6.3 of the 12-hour days.

The employees complained that this was less than the 10 days referred to in section 96 of the Act.  The employees contended that “day” means a period of 24 hours in which ordinary work is performed and not a notional day of 7.6 working hours.

By a 2-1 majority, the Full Court ruled that a “day” for the purposes of the leave provision in the Act meant a 24-hour period in which ordinary hours of work is carried out.

Impact of the decision

The decision has implications for thousands of employees who work shift work, particularly in the healthcare and manufacturing sectors, and could see huge back-pay bills for employers.

Employers who engage workers who work non-standard hours (ie. shiftworkers) should, in light of this decision, review their personal leave accrual, deduction and payroll systems to ensure that such employees could, in theory, take 10 shifts as personal leave from work every year, without loss of pay.

A Festive Reminder: Employee Entitlements during the Holiday Season

As 2020 quickly approaches, there are a number of upcoming statutory holidays that would trigger obligations of employers to their employees. Below, we have summarized some the most important obligations of provincially regulated employers in Alberta, British Columbia, Ontario and Quebec, as well as federally regulated employers, to their employees with respect to the upcoming statutory holidays.

Which Days?

Christmas, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day

Every jurisdiction in Canada recognizes Christmas Day (December 25) and New Year’s Day (January 1) as statutory holidays. However, only Ontario (under the Employment Standards Act, 2000) and the federal government (under the Canada Labour Code) recognize Boxing Day (December 26) as a statutory holiday.

Non-Statutory Religious Holidays

Although employees are not automatically entitled to pay for time taken off for non-statutory religious holidays, employers should be mindful of their duty to accommodate employees for religious holidays under applicable human rights legislation.

By way of example, the Ontario Human Rights Tribunal in Markovic v Autocom Manufacturing Ltd. provided useful guidance on the extent of employer’s duty to accommodate employees for non-statutory religious holidays.[1] Markovic involved a human rights complaint in which the employee alleged that his employer had discriminated against him on the basis of his creed by failing to pay him for the time he took off work for Eastern Orthodox Christmas on January 7, 2004. The employer subsequently developed a policy for responding to employee requests to take time off for religious holidays. The question in front of the Tribunal was whether the policy satisfied the employer’s accommodation obligations under the Ontario Human Rights Code.

Answering the question in the positive, the Tribunal concluded from a review of the relevant case law that providing a process for employees to arrange for time off for religious observances through options for scheduling changes, without loss of pay, fulfills the employer’s duty to accommodate. For more context, the options provided in the policy in question included making up for the time on a later date that is a secular holiday or when the employee would not ordinarily be scheduled to work and being paid for the substituted shift or working hours, switching shifts with another employee and being paid for the substituted shift, adjusting the employee’s shift schedule where possible, using any outstanding paid vacation for the time off, or taking a leave of absence without pay.

Eligibility and Pay

Jurisdiction Who is eligible? How much to pay?
Federal Under the Canada Labour Code, employees are entitled to be paid for prescribed statutory holidays, including Christmas, Boxing Day and New Year’s Day. Alternatively, employees may add this day to their annual vacation or may take it at a time convenient to both the employee and the employer.

However, an employee is not entitled to holiday pay if they do not report for work after having been called to work on that day, or for which they make themselves unavailable to work when the conditions of the employment in the industrial establishment in which they are employed require them to be available or allow them to make themselves unavailable.

This last rules only applies to employees who are employed in a continuous operation, which include:

a) any industrial establishment in which, in each seven-day period, operations once begun normally continue with cessation until the completion of the regularly scheduled operations for that period;

b) any operations or service concerned with the running of trains, planes, ships, trucks or other vehicles, whether in schedules or non-scheduled operations;

c) any telephone, radio, television, telegraph or other communication or broadcasting operations; and

d) any operation or service normally carried on without regard to Sundays or general holidays.

Holiday Pay

An employer shall pay its employee holiday pay equal to or greater than their daily wages, calculated by taking one twentieth of the wages, excluding overtime pay, that the employee earned during the four week before the holiday week.

Additional Pay for Holiday Work

If an employee is required to work on a holiday, in addition to the holiday pay, the employer shall pay the employee wages at a rate equal to at least one and one-half times their regular rate of wages for the time that they work on that day. An employee employed in a continuous operation who is required to work on the holiday will be paid the additional pay, given a holiday with pay at some other time, or be paid holiday pay for the first day on which they do not work after that day if their collective agreement so provides.

British Columbia To be eligible for holiday pay, an employee must have been employed by the employer for at least 30 calendar days before the holiday, and:

a) has worked or earned wages for 15 of the 30 calendar days preceding the holiday; or

b) has worked under an averaging agreement under the Employment Standards Act of BC at any time within that 30 calendar day period.

Employee not Working on a Holiday

An employee who is given a day off on a statutory holiday or is given another day off in substitution for a holiday must be paid an amount equal to at least an average day’s pay, which is calculated by dividing the amount paid or payable to the employee for work done during and wages earned within the 30 calendar days before the holiday (including vacation pay) less any overtime pay, by the number of days the employee has worked or earned wage within that 30 day period.

This average day’s pay applies whether or not the holiday falls on the employee’s regularly scheduled day off.

Employee Working on a Holiday

If an employee works on a holiday, they must be paid  1 ½ times their regular wage for the first 12 hours worked, and double the regular wage for any time worked up to 12 hours, as well as an averaged day’s pay determined using the formula above.

Alberta To be eligible for holiday pay, an employee must have worked for the employer for 30 work days or more in the 12 months preceding the holiday. An employee is not entitled to general holiday pay if the employee does not work on a holiday when required or scheduled to so, or is absent from employment without the consent of the employer on the work day before or after a holiday. Holiday Falls on a Regular Day of Work: Employee works on the holiday

If a holiday falls on a regular work day* and the employee works on the holiday, then the employee is entitled to general holiday pay of an amount that is equal to: (1) at least their average daily wage and an amount that is at least 1.5 times their wage rate for each hour worked on that day, or (2) the standard wage rate for each hour worked on the holiday and a day off with pay where the pay is at least as much as their average daily wage.

Holiday Falls on a Regular Day of Work: Employee does not work on the holiday

If the holiday falls on a regular day of work and an employee doesn’t work on the holiday, then the employee is entitled to general holiday pay of an amount that is at least their average daily wage.

Holiday Falls on a Non-Regular Work Day: Employee works on the holiday

If an employee works on a holiday that is not considered a regular work day, then the employee is entitled to general holiday pay of an amount that is equal to at least 1.5 times their wage rate for each hour worked on that day.

Holiday Falls on a Non-Regular Work Day: Employee does not work on the holiday

If the holiday falls on a non-regular day of work and an employee doesn’t work, they are not entitled to general holiday pay.

Holiday During Annual Vacation

If an eligible employee is on vacation when a general holiday occurs, the employee can either: (1) take off with pay the first scheduled working day after their vacation; or (2) in agreement with their employer, take another day that would otherwise have been a work day before their next annual vacation.

* A regular day of work is every workday in an employee’s normal schedule: if the employee works the same days every week, those days are considered their regular days of work. Other days are not regular days of work.

Ontario An employee is not eligible for holiday pay if he or she fails, without reasonable cause, to work on the work day before or after the holiday. An employee’s holiday pay is generally calculated by dividing the total amount of regular wages earned and vacation pay earned in the four weeks before the holiday week by 20.

Holiday Falling on a Work Day

If a holiday falls on an ordinary work day for an employee and they are not on vacation, the employer must give the employee the day off and pay him the holiday pay.

If the employee and employer agree for the employee to work on the holiday, the employer shall pay the employee their regular wages for the hours worked, and substitute a working day for the holiday and pay the employee holiday pay for the substituting day. The day substituting for the holiday must be within three months after the holiday or, if the employee and employer agree, within twelve months after the holiday. The employer must also provide the employee before the holiday a written statement that sets out the holiday that is being substituted, the date of the substituting day and the date on which the statement is provided to the employee. Alternatively, if the employee and employer agree, the employer can instead pay the employee holiday pay for the day plus premium pay for each hour worked.  Premium pay is an amount that is at least one and one half times the employee’s regular rate. The legislation also prescribes specific calculation methods and entitlements to holiday pay if the employee fails to perform the work that they agreed to perform on the holiday.

Holiday Not Falling on a Work Day

If a holiday does not fall on an ordinary work day or falls on a vacation day for an employee, the employer must substitute another work day for the holiday and pay the employee holiday pay for the substituting day. The day substituting for the holiday must be within three months after the holiday or, if the employee and employer agree, within twelve months after the holiday.  The employer must also provide the employee before the holiday a written statement that sets out the holiday that is being substituted, the date of the substituting day and the date on which the statement is provided to the employee.

Alternatively, if the employee agrees, the employer may pay the employee holiday pay for the holiday instead of substituting another day for the holiday.

If the employee and employer agree for the employee to work on the holiday, the employer must pay the employee his regular wages for the hours worked, and substitute another work day for the holiday and pay holiday pay for the substituting day.  The same written requirements and restrictions regarding the substitution would apply.  Alternatively, if the employee and employer agree, the employer can pay the employee holiday pay for the day plus premium pay for each hour worked. The legislation also prescribes specific calculation methods and entitlements to holiday pay if the employee fails to perform the work that they agreed to perform on the holiday.

Quebec An employee is not entitled to holiday pay if the employee has been absent from work without the employer’s authorization or without valid cause on the working day before or after the holiday. The holiday pay for each statutory general holiday must be 1/20 of the wages the employee has earned during the four complete weeks of pay before the week of the holiday, excluding overtime.

Employee Working on Holiday

If an employee must work on a holiday, the employer must pay the employee his regular wages plus the holiday pay, or grant them a compensatory holiday, which must be taken within the three weeks before or after the holiday unless a collective agreement or a decree provides for a longer period.

Holiday Falling on Non-Work Day or Annual Leave

If a holiday falls on a non-work day or annual leave of an employee, the employer must pay the employee the holiday pay or grant them a compensatory holiday on a date agreed upon between the employer and the employee or fixed by a collective agreement or a decree.

Provisions regarding statutory holiday entitlements and payments may apply differently to employers who are party to collective agreements as well as employers in specific sectors. For example, Ontario has specific provisions regarding hospitals, continuous operations, hotels, motels, tourist resorts, restaurants, and taverns. The methods of calculation for holiday pay may also vary if employees are remunerated by commission or other incentive pays.

Happy Holidays!

The authors would like to thank Simon Gollish, articling student in Ottawa, for his contribution to this publication.

[1] Markovic v Autocom Manufacturing Ltd, 2008 HRTO 64 [Markovic].

Un joyeux rappel : Droits des employés pendant le temps des Fêtes

Comme 2020 approche à grands pas, il y a un certain nombre de jours fériés à venir qui créent des obligations pour les employeurs envers leurs employés. Nous avons résumé ci-dessous certaines des plus importantes obligations ayant trait à ces jours fériés pour les employeurs régis par les lois provinciales de l’Alberta, de la Colombie-Britannique, de l’Ontario et du Québec, ainsi que pour les employeurs régis par les lois fédérales, envers leurs employés.

Quelles sont ces journées?

Noël, lendemain de Noël et jour de l’An

Tous les ressorts du Canada reconnaissent Noël (25 décembre) et le jour de l’An (1er janvier) comme des jours fériés. Toutefois, seulement l’Ontario (en vertu de la Loi de 2000 sur les normes d’emploi) et le gouvernement fédéral (en vertu du Code canadien du travail) reconnaissent le lendemain de Noël (26 décembre) comme un jour férié.

Jours de fête religieuse non couverts par la loi

Bien que les employés n’aient pas automatiquement droit à un congé payé lorsqu’ils s’absentent lors de jours de fête religieuse non couverts par la loi, les employeurs devraient être conscients de leur obligation d’accommodement envers leurs employés pour les jours de fête religieuse en vertu de la législation sur les droits de la personne applicable.

À titre d’exemple, le Tribunal des droits de la personne de l’Ontario dans l’affaire Markovic v Autocom Manufacturing Ltd. a fourni une orientation utile quant à l’étendue de l’obligation d’accommodement d’un employeur envers un employé en ce qui concerne des jours de fête religieuse non couverts par la loi[1]. L’affaire Markovic traitait d’une plainte en matière de droits de la personne portée par un employé qui alléguait que son employeur avait exercé de la discrimination fondée sur la croyance à son encontre en ne lui payant pas le congé qu’il avait pris pour célébrer le Noël orthodoxe oriental le 7 janvier 2004. L’employeur a subséquemment élaboré une politique pour répondre aux demandes de congé formulées par des employés pour observer des fêtes religieuses. La question à trancher par le Tribunal était de savoir si la politique satisfaisait l’obligation d’accommodement de l’employeur en vertu du Code des droits de la personne de l’Ontario.

Répondant par l’affirmative, le Tribunal a conclu, après avoir passé en revue la jurisprudence pertinente, qu’en mettant à la disposition des employés un processus leur permettant de prendre des congés pour observer des fêtes religieuses grâce à des aménagements de l’horaire de travail, sans perte de salaire, l’employeur remplit son obligation d’accommodement. Dans l’affaire en cause, la politique offrait les possibilités suivantes : reprise du temps à une date ultérieure correspondant à un congé laïque ou à un moment où il n’était pas prévu que l’employé travaille et salaire versé pour ce quart de travail remplacé ou ces heures travaillées, changement de quart de travail avec un autre employé et salaire versé pour le quart de travail remplacé, ajustement de l’horaire de travail de l’employé lorsque les conditions le permettent et utilisation d’une journée de vacances payée non utilisée pour le congé ou prise d’un congé sans solde.

Admissibilité et rémunération

Ressort Qui est admissible? Quelle somme verser?
Fédéral En vertu du Code canadien du travail, les employés ont le droit d’être payés pour les jours fériés prévus par la loi, dont Noël, le lendemain de Noël et le 1er janvier. Autrement, les employés peuvent ajouter cette journée à leurs vacances annuelles ou prendre le congé à un moment qui convient à la fois à l’employé et à l’employeur.

Cependant, un employé n’a pas droit à une indemnité de congé pour le jour férié où, selon le cas, il ne se présente pas au travail après y avoir été appelé ou il fait en sorte de ne pas être disponible pour travailler alors qu’en vertu des conditions d’emploi dans l’établissement où il travaille, soit il serait tenu de se rendre ainsi disponible, soit il peut choisir de ne pas être ainsi disponible.

Cette dernière règle s’applique uniquement à l’employé occupé à un travail ininterrompu, ce qui comprend :

a) un employé qui travaille dans un établissement où, au cours de chaque période de sept jours, les travaux, une fois normalement commencés dans le cadre du programme régulier prévu pour cette période, se poursuivent sans arrêt jusqu’à leur achèvement;

b) un employé dont le travail a trait au fonctionnement de véhicules, notamment trains, avions, navires ou camions, que ce soit ou non dans le cadre d’un programme régulier;

c) un employé qui travaille dans les communications : téléphone, radio, télévision, télégraphes ou autres moyens; et

d) un employé qui travaille dans un secteur qui fonctionne normalement sans qu’il soit tenu compte des dimanches ou des jours fériés.

Indemnité de congé

Un employeur doit verser à son employé une indemnité de congé égale ou supérieure à son salaire quotidien, calculée en prenant un vingtième du salaire gagné par l’employé durant les quatre semaines précédant la semaine du congé, compte non tenu des heures supplémentaires.

Majoration pour travail effectué

Si un employé est tenu de travailler un jour férié, en plus de l’indemnité de congé, l’employeur doit lui verser un salaire correspondant au moins à une fois et demie son salaire régulier pour les heures de travail fournies ce jour-là. Un employé occupé à un travail ininterrompu qui est tenu de travailler un jour férié recevra une somme additionnelle, aura droit à un congé payé qu’il peut prendre à un autre moment ou, lorsque la convention collective qui le régit le prévoit, recevra une indemnité de congé pour le premier jour où il ne travaille pas par la suite.

Colombie-Britannique Pour être admissible à une indemnité de congé, un employé doit être à l’emploi de l’employeur depuis au moins 30 jours civils avant le jour férié et :

a) a travaillé ou gagné un salaire pendant 15 jours durant la période de 30 jours civils précédant le jour férié; ou

b) a travaillé aux termes d’une entente de calcul de la moyenne en vertu de la loi de la Colombie-Britannique intitulée Employment Standards Act à un quelconque moment pendant cette période de 30 jours civils.

Employé qui ne travaille pas un jour férié

Un employé à qui l’on accorde un congé un jour férié ou à qui l’on accorde un autre jour de congé en remplacement d’un jour férié doit recevoir un salaire égal à au moins un salaire quotidien moyen, qui est calculé en divisant la somme payée ou payable à l’employé pour le travail effectué et le salaire gagné pendant la période de 30 jours civils avant le jour férié (y compris la paie de vacances), compte non tenu des heures supplémentaires, par le nombre de jours durant lesquels l’employé a travaillé ou reçu un salaire pendant cette période 30 jours.

Ce salaire quotidien moyen s’applique, que le jour férié tombe ou non le jour de congé régulier prévu de l’employé.

Employé qui travaille un jour férié

Si un employé travaille un jour férié, il doit recevoir une fois et demie son salaire régulier pour les 12 premières heures travaillées, puis le double de son salaire régulier pour toute heure travaillée jusqu’à 12 heures, ainsi qu’un salaire quotidien moyen déterminé au moyen de la formule susmentionnée.

Alberta Pour être admissible à une indemnité de congé, un employé doit avoir travaillé pour l’employeur pendant 30 jours de travail ou plus pendant la période de 12 mois précédant le jour férié. Un employé n’a pas droit à une indemnité de congé si l’employé ne travaille pas un jour férié lorsqu’il y est tenu ou lorsqu’il est prévu qu’il travaille ce jour-là, ou s’il s’absente sans le consentement de l’employeur le jour de travail avant ou après le jour férié. Jour férié tombant un jour de travail régulier : l’employé travaille le jour férié

Si un jour férié tombe un jour de travail régulier* et que l’employé travaille le jour férié, l’employé a alors droit à une indemnité de congé d’une somme égale à : 1) au moins son salaire quotidien moyen et une somme correspondant à au moins une fois et demie son taux de salaire pour chaque heure travaillée ce jour-là ou 2) le taux de salaire standard pour chaque heure travaillée le jour férié et un jour de congé payé avec un salaire correspondant au moins à son salaire quotidien moyen.

Jour férié tombant un jour de travail régulier : l’employé ne travaille pas le jour férié

Si le jour férié tombe un jour de travail régulier et que l’employé ne travaille pas le jour férié, alors l’employé a droit à une indemnité de congé correspondant au moins à son salaire quotidien moyen.

Jour férié tombant un jour de travail non régulier : l’employé travaille le jour férié

Si un employé travaille un jour férié qui n’est pas considéré comme un jour de travail régulier, alors l’employé a droit à une indemnité de congé correspondant au moins à une fois et demie son taux de salaire pour chaque heure travaillée ce jour-là.

Jour férié tombant un jour de travail non régulier : l’employé ne travaille pas le jour férié

Si le jour férié tombe un jour de travail non régulier et que l’employé ne travaille pas, il n’a pas droit à une indemnité de congé.

Jour férié pendant les vacances annuelles

Si un jour férié survient pendant les vacances annuelles d’un employé admissible, l’employé peut : 1) soit prendre un jour de congé payé le premier jour de travail prévu après ses vacances, 2) soit, avec l’accord de son employeur, prendre un autre jour qui autrement aurait été un jour de travail avant ses prochaines vacances annuelles.

* Un jour de travail régulier correspond à chaque jour de travail de l’horaire normal de l’employé : si l’employé travaille les mêmes jours chaque semaine, ces jours sont considérés comme ses jours de travail réguliers. Les autres jours ne constituent pas des jours de travail réguliers.

Ontario Un employé n’est pas admissible à une indemnité de congé s’il s’absente, sans motif raisonnable, du travail le jour de travail avant ou après le jour férié. L’indemnité de congé de l’employé est généralement calculée en divisant par 20 la somme totale du salaire régulier gagné et de la paie de vacances gagnée pendant les quatre semaines avant la semaine du jour férié.

Jour férié tombant un jour de travail

Si un jour férié tombe un jour de travail normal pour l’employé et qu’il n’est pas en vacances, l’employeur doit donner congé à l’employé et lui verser une indemnité de congé.

Si l’employé et l’employeur conviennent que l’employé travaillera le jour férié, l’employeur doit verser à l’employé son salaire régulier pour les heures travaillées et remplacer le jour férié par un autre jour de travail, et verser à l’employé une indemnité de congé à l’égard du jour remplaçant le jour férié. Ce jour remplaçant le jour férié doit tomber dans les trois mois suivant le jour férié ou, si l’employé et l’employeur en conviennent, dans les douze mois suivant le jour férié. L’employeur doit aussi fournir à l’employé, avant le jour férié, une déclaration écrite qui indique le jour férié qui est remplacé, la date du jour de remplacement et la date à laquelle la déclaration est fournie à l’employé. Par ailleurs, si l’employé et l’employeur en conviennent, l’employeur peut plutôt verser à l’employé l’indemnité de congé à l’égard du jour férié, majorée d’une prime pour chaque heure travaillée. La prime correspond à une somme qui est au moins équivalente à une fois et demie le taux régulier de l’employé. La législation prévoit aussi des modes de calcul particuliers et des droits à une indemnité de congé si l’employé n’effectue pas le travail qu’il avait convenu d’effectuer le jour férié.

Jour férié ne tombant pas un jour de travail

Si un jour férié ne tombe pas un jour de travail normal ou tombe un jour de vacances d’un employé, l’employeur doit remplacer le jour férié par un autre jour de travail et verser à l’employé une indemnité de congé pour le jour de remplacement. Le jour de remplacement du jour férié doit tomber dans les trois mois suivant le jour férié ou, si l’employé et l’employeur en conviennent, dans les douze mois suivant le jour férié. L’employeur doit aussi fournir à l’employé, avant le jour férié, une déclaration écrite qui indique le jour férié qui est remplacé, la date du jour de remplacement et la date à laquelle la déclaration est fournie à l’employé.

Par ailleurs, si l’employé accepte, l’employeur peut verser à l’employé l’indemnité de congé à l’égard du jour férié au lieu de remplacer le jour férié par un autre jour de travail.

Si l’employé et l’employeur conviennent que l’employé travaillera le jour férié, l’employeur doit verser à l’employé son salaire régulier pour les heures travaillées et remplacer le jour férié par un autre jour de travail et verser à l’employé une indemnité de congé à l’égard du jour remplaçant le jour férié. Les mêmes exigences et restrictions écrites relatives à la substitution s’appliqueraient. Par ailleurs, si l’employé et l’employeur en conviennent, l’employeur peut verser à l’employé l’indemnité de congé à l’égard du jour férié, majorée d’une prime pour chaque heure travaillée. La législation prévoit aussi des modes de calcul particuliers et des droits à une indemnité de congé si l’employé n’effectue pas le travail qu’il avait convenu d’effectuer le jour férié.

Québec Un employé n’est pas admissible à une indemnité de congé s’il s’est absenté du travail sans autorisation de l’employeur ou sans raison valable le jour avant ou après le jour férié. L’indemnité de congé pour chaque jour férié doit être égale à 1/20 du salaire gagné de l’employé au cours des quatre semaines complètes de paie précédant la semaine du jour férié, compte non tenu des heures supplémentaires.

Employé travaillant un jour férié

Si un employé doit travailler un jour férié, l’employeur doit lui verser son salaire régulier majoré de l’indemnité de congé ou lui accorder un congé compensatoire, lequel peut être pris dans les trois semaines qui précèdent ou qui suivent le jour férié, à moins qu’une convention collective ou un décret ne prévoie une période plus longue.

Jour férié tombant un jour de congé ou un jour de vacances annuelles

Si un jour férié tombe un jour de congé ou un jour de vacances annuelles de l’employé, l’employeur doit verser à l’employé l’indemnité de congé ou lui accorder un congé compensatoire à une date convenue par l’employé et l’employeur ou fixée par convention collective ou décret.

Les dispositions relatives aux droits à des jours fériés et aux paiements qui s’y rattachent prévus par la loi peuvent s’appliquer différemment aux employeurs qui sont parties à des conventions collectives, ainsi qu’aux employeurs de secteurs particuliers. Par exemple, l’Ontario compte des dispositions particulières relatives aux hôpitaux, aux exploitations à fonctionnement ininterrompu, aux hôtels, aux motels, aux lieux de villégiature, aux restaurants et aux tavernes. Les méthodes de calcul de l’indemnité de congé peuvent aussi varier si les employés sont rémunérés à la commission ou reçoivent d’autres primes.

Joyeuses Fêtes!

Les auteurs désirent remercier Simon Gollish, stagiaire à Ottawa, pour son aide dans la préparation de cette publication.

[1] Markovic v Autocom Manufacturing Ltd, 2008 HRTO 64 [Markovic].

La perte de contrôle d’un camion par un salarié n’exclut pas la faute de l’employeur

Dans le cadre de leurs missions, les salariés doivent respecter l’ensemble des règles (notamment de sécurité) applicables. En particulier, les chauffeurs routiers sont astreints au respect du Code de la Route.

Mais l’employeur est également responsable de la sécurité de ses salariés et, si l’obligation de sécurité n’est désormais plus une obligation de résultat, il n’en demeure pas moins que la responsabilité de l’employeur peut être engagée au titre de l’obligation de sécurité lorsque celui-ci a manqué à ses obligations à ce titre.

Dans le cadre de cette affaire, le salarié, chauffeur d’un poids lourd, avait perdu le contrôle de son véhicule, à la suite de quoi il avait été éjecté de son véhicule.

Les causes de la perte de contrôle du véhicule par le salarié étaient restées inconnues, le salarié ne se souvenant pas des faits. L’employeur démontrait avoir régulièrement entretenu le véhicule, effectué les contrôles techniques obligatoires, et respecter les cadences de travail. L’analyse du disque chronotachygraphe à laquelle les services de gendarmerie se sont livrée n’avait pas donné lieu à observation de leur part.

Le salarié n’avait pas sa ceinture de sécurité, le poids lourd étant démuni de cet équipement (pourtant obligatoire dans les véhicules de plus de 3,5 tonnes depuis le 1er octobre 1999).

L’accident de la route fut reconnu comme un accident du travail, ce qui n’était pas contestable. Le salarié victime avait alors agi en responsabilité de son employeur pour faute inexcusable. Il soulevait notamment que le véhicule aurait dû être équipé d’une ceinture de sécurité, et que son absence avait concouru à la gravité de l’accident dont il a été victime.

L’employeur soutenait, pour sa part, que l’absence de ceinture de sécurité n’avait pas fait l’objet de remarque dans cadre du contrôle technique du véhicule, et qu’en tout état de cause, cette défaillance n’avait joué aucun rôle dans la survenance de l’accident qui résultait de la perte de contrôle du camion par son conducteur.

La Cour d’appel a refusé de retenir la faute de l’employeur au motif que le salarié a perdu le contrôle de son véhicule pour une raison inconnue et qu’il n’apportait pas la preuve de la responsabilité de l’employeur dans la réalisation de l’accident.

La Cour de cassation a refusé de suivre le raisonnement de la Cour d’appel et a, au contraire, reconnu la faute inexcusable de l’employeur.

Les juges ont en effet considéré, par un attendu de principe, « qu’il est indifférent que la faute inexcusable commise par l’employeur ait été la cause déterminante de l’accident survenu au salarié, mais qu’il suffit qu’elle en soit une cause nécessaire pour que la responsabilité de l’employeur soit engagée, alors même que d’autres fautes auraient concouru au dommage ».

Selon les juges, dans la mesure où le salarié avait été éjecté de son véhicule par le pare-brise, l’absence de ceinture de sécurité avait nécessairement concouru à la réalisation du dommage (c’est-à-dire la conséquence de l’accident, et non sa cause). La responsabilité de l’employeur est donc engagée.

Le raisonnement tenu par la Cour de cassation prive l’employeur de la possibilité de s’exonérer ou d’atténuer sa responsabilité en rapportant la preuve d’une faute de la victime, d’un tiers ou d’une cause extérieure, dès lors qu’un manquement à son obligation de sécurité peut lui être reproché, et aura concouru au dommage.

Rappelons que la reconnaissance de la faute inexcusable de l’employeur peut avoir des conséquences financières importantes (indemnisation des préjudices subis par le salarié ou par ses ayants-droit, rente majorée…). En terme de sécurité des salariés, la vigilance est de mise.

Enforcement and bargaining power of trade unions

Trade unions should shape working life in a meaningful way through collective agreements ensuring good working relations. In order to be eligible for collective bargaining, they must have a minimum bargaining unit vis-à-vis the workplace, says the German Federal Constitutional Court.

In Germany, the labour courts decide whether associations are eligible for collective bargaining and can therefore be parties to a collective agreement. Not only companies where the workforce is seeking the collective bargaining, but also competing associations may question the classification of an association as a trade union and seek to have their bargaining capacity denied. In the present case, following such request, the Higher Labour Court had classified an association of employees in the private insurance sector as not eligible for collective bargaining. The association then filed a constitutional complaint arguing a violation of its fundamental right to freedom of association.

The Federal Constitutional Court rejected the complaint (Order of 13.09.2019, Ref. 1 BvR 1/16) holding that it is not a violation of the right of freedom of association if collective bargaining autonomy is granted only to those associations that have adequate organizational unity and assertiveness and are able to fulfill their tasks independently of the goodwill of employers and other employee groups. The number of employees represented by the association determines its ability to negotiate and its organizational efficiency. It also provides evidence as to whether an association can build up sufficient pressure to win and conclude collective agreements. The denial of the collective bargaining capacity to splinter associations without sufficient membership does not conflict with the fundamental right to freedom of association.

In the present case, the Higher Court could not establish with certainty that the union was sufficiently powerful. Nevertheless, the court’s assumption that the union’s influence is not guaranteed by a membership of 0.05% of the workforce, taking into account the composition of its members, seems plausible.

LexBlog