Government consultation on reform of post-termination non-compete clauses in employment

On 4 December 2020, the UK Government launched a consultation on reforming post-termination non-compete clauses in employment contracts. The consultation seeks views on proposals to require employers to pay employees for the period of the restriction; requiring employers to provide additional transparency by providing in writing the exact terms of the non-compete clause before their employment commence; introducing a statutory limit on the length of non-compete clauses; or, alternatively prohibiting the use of such clauses altogether.

Post termination restrictions or restrictive covenants are often included in employment contracts. Non-compete clauses are one type of restriction, which limits an employee’s ability … Continue Reading

The Financial compensation for a non-compete provision can be invalid if too high says the French Supreme Court!

In France, the rules governing post-termination, non-compete and/or non-solicitation clauses in employment contracts have been established through case law. Restrictive covenants in an employment contract are only considered enforceable by French courts if they meet the following criteria (which are cumulative) :

– They do not extend beyond what is reasonably necessary to protect the legitimate interest of the employer;

– they are limited in terms of activity, geographical area and duration and the extent of the restrictions should be adapted appropriately to reflect the specific employee’s status and duties;

– they comply with any applicable sector-wide collective bargaining agreement; … Continue Reading

Can employers require their employees to get the Covid-19 vaccine?

With the announcement that one of the Covid-19 vaccines has received approval from the UK regulator, employers are now asking whether they can insist that employees are vaccinated before returning to the workplace. There are clearly legal and moral issues that need to be considered.

Firstly, the anticipated Covid-19 vaccination programme in the UK will not be made mandatory as the UK government does not have legal power to do this, alongside the challenges and human rights concerns this would raise in any event. The UK Government has the power to prevent, control or mitigate the spread of an infection … Continue Reading

Workpac granted leave to appeal Rossato judgment

On 26 November 2020, the High Court granted a special leave application made by labour hire company Workpac to appeal the Full Federal Court’s finding in the matter of Workpac Pty Ltd v Rossato [2020] FCAFC 84 (Rossato) which was handed down earlier this year. In Rossato, the Court held that a casual employee engaged on a regular, systemic and predictable basis was entitled to leave entitlements, plus payment for public holidays, as set out in the National Employment Standards (NES) of the Fair Work Act 2009 (Cth) and, controversially, that Workpac was not entitled … Continue Reading

Western Australia set for WHS Reform

The Work Health and Safety Bill 2019 (WA) received assent on 10 November 2020 (WHS Act). The WHS Act introduces the offence of industrial manslaughter and will harmonise WA’s work health and safety (WHS) laws with most other Australian states and territories. This harmonisation is long overdue in WA with the other states and territories having adopted the model WHS laws between 2011 and 2012, with the exception of Victoria which has nonetheless still amended its legislation to provide for industrial manslaughter.

The WHS Act is expected to come into full effect in the first half of 2021 … Continue Reading

California imposes new requirement of a COVID-19 Prevention Program

With the approval of Cal/OSHA’s new COVID-19 regulations, the proponents of action-taking won out over those who felt California’s existing laws, regulations, and enforcement arsenal were sufficient to meet the moment. It’s clear that California likes to lead—though it’s not the first state to enact specific COVID-19 standards (Virginia and Oregon got there first).… Continue Reading

Transfert partiel d’entreprise : les errements de la Cour de cassation

Dans une décision du 30 septembre 2020, la Cour de cassation revient une nouvelle fois sur le sort des salariés transférés dans le cadre d’un transfert partiel d’entreprise.

Lorsqu’une partie de l’activité d’une entreprise est transférée à un repreneur, il convient de vérifier si les salariés transfèrent également à ce repreneur. Aux termes de l’article L1224-1 du Code du travail, le contrat de travail des salariés attachés à cette activité est automatiquement transféré au repreneur si une entité économique autonome est transférée.

L’entité économique autonome est définie par une jurisprudence constante comme un ensemble organisé de personnes et d’éléments corporels … Continue Reading

US: California employers must take measures to curb workplace spread of coronavirus under emergency CAL/OSHA rules

The California Occupational Safety and Health Standards Board has approved emergency, temporary COVID-19 regulations under California’s Occupational Safety & Health Act. California employers must now establish specific measures to curb the spread of COVID-19 in nearly every workplace in California.  The emergency regulations, which the Standards Board approved on Thursday night by a unanimous vote, must first be submitted to the Office of Administrative Law (OAL) for final approval. Upon submission, the OAL will have only 10 calendar days to approve or deny the proposed emergency regulations. If approved, the OAL will file the emergency regulation with the Secretary of … Continue Reading

Effectuer des enquêtes en milieu de travail… pendant une pandémie

Cette année, les employeurs ont dû relever d’innombrables défis, notamment celui d’effectuer efficacement une enquête en milieu de travail alors que les protocoles de santé et sécurité exigent un certain degré de séparation. Heureusement, les règles de base pour les employeurs sont les mêmes, que ceux-ci effectuent une enquête en respectant une distance de deux mètres ou virtuellement sur Zoom.

  • Ne retardez pas (indûment) :  Avec le temps, les souvenirs s’effacent et les arbitres peuvent interpréter les retards comme un signe que les agissements ne sont pas pris au sérieux ou qu’ils sont tolérés. Cependant, cela ne signifie pas que
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Conducting Workplace Investigations… in a Pandemic

This year has created innumerable challenges for employers— including the challenge of how to effectively conduct a workplace investigation when health and safety protocols demand a certain degree of separation. Fortunately, the same Do’s and Don’ts still apply to employers, whether they are conducting an investigation two meters apart or virtually through Zoom.

  • Don’t (inexcusably) delay: Memories fade over time and adjudicators may interpret delay as a sign that the conduct is insignificant or that the conduct is condoned. This does not mean that investigations need to be rushed, however— on the contrary, hasty investigations can be equally fatal.  Best
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