Tag archives: EEOC

US: Return to work considerations for New York employers during COVID-19 pandemic

Businesses with operations in New York State and, particularly, in New York City, face unique obstacles with respect to reopening their businesses during the COVID-19 pandemic.  With over 380,000 confirmed cases across the state, and over 200,000 confirmed cases in New York City, most New York residents have been affected by the virus in some way, and many are apprehensive about reentering the workplace. New York City’s dense population of over 8 million residents and approximately 10 million commuters — many of whom rely on public transportation — undoubtedly exacerbates these concerns.  In light of these concerns, Governor Cuomo extended … Continue Reading

US employment law considerations for COVID-19 coronavirus

COVID-19, the 2019 novel coronavirus (“COVID-19” or the “coronavirus”) is naturally on the minds of US employers as the number of cases in the US continues to rise. Although the Centers for Disease Control is still advising that most people in the US have a low immediate risk of exposure, that could change and employers are well advised to consider some basic questions that could arise in the future. We pose and answer some of those basic questions in our article US employers must consider multiple legal requirements when addressing coronavirus concerns. Remember that individual situations can vary and … Continue Reading

UPDATE: September 30, 2019 deadline for employer pay data reporting to EEOC will cover both 2017 and 2018 pay data

September 30th deadline to provide pay data to EEOC will cover both 2017 and 2018 pay data

As we previously reported in our articles Employers with 100 or more employees must provide pay data to the EEOC by September 30, 2019 and New EEOC pay data deadline: September 30, 2019, following an April 25, 2019 federal court ruling, employers with 100 or more employees should begin to prepare to report pay data to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019.

As discussed in our prior article, the recent federal court ruling mandated employer reporting … Continue Reading

Employers with 100 or more employees must provide pay data to the EEOC by September 30, 2019

September 30th deadline to provide pay data to EEOC

Following an April 25, 2019 federal court ruling, employers with 100 or more employees should begin to prepare to report pay data to the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) by September 30, 2019.  While there is a possibility that an appeals court could stay this reporting requirement before then, covered employers should operate under the assumption that they will need to meet this September 30, 2019 deadline.

Background on pay data reporting requirement

Under current law, employers with 100 or more employees and federal contractors with 50 or more employees … Continue Reading

Title VII sexual orientation claims are gaining traction with more courts

On November 4, 2016, a federal judge in Pennsylvania became the latest jurist to side with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) in endorsing the viability of claims based on sexual orientation under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. In U.S. EEOC v. Scott Medical Health Center, the EEOC brought suit on behalf of a gay male employee based on a sexually hostile work environment allegedly caused by his male supervisor.  During the EEOC’s investigation into charges filed by the employee’s co-workers, the agency learned of sex-based comments being directed towards the employee, including terms … Continue Reading

“Promising practices” encouraged by EEOC to prevent retaliation

The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) has issued its final “Enforcement Guidance on Retaliation and Related Issues” following a six-month public comment period. The guidance replaces the EEOC’s 1988 Compliance Manual section on retaliation.

Workplace retaliation claims have been on the rise in recent years and have been the focus of several opinions of the U.S. Supreme Court in the past two decades. In fact, charges of retaliation exceeded race discrimination claims in 2009 and comprised nearly 45 percent of all charges received by the EEOC in 2015.

In addition to defining retaliation and providing over thirty … Continue Reading

Does Title VII cover sexual orientation claims? It depends.

In July 2015, the EEOC officially took the position that sexual orientation claims may be brought under the non-discrimination provisions of Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964. However, in the recent case of Hively v. Ivy Tech Community College, the Seventh Circuit refused to accept the EEOC’s position and affirmed the dismissal of a sexual orientation discrimination claim holding that such claims are not cognizable under Title VII.

Following the United States Supreme Court’s 1989 decision in Price Waterhouse v. Hopkins, federal courts have consistently recognized sexual stereotype or gender non-conformity claims as a species … Continue Reading

Retaliation and whistleblower claims in healthcare expected to remain high

The number of retaliation and whistleblower claims in the US continue to rise. According to data released by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC), retaliation claims made up 44.5 percent of all charges filed in 2015.  Also, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) reported a 6 percent increase in the number of whistleblower cases filed in FY 2015.  The increase in retaliation and whistleblowing claims is especially felt in the healthcare industry where whistleblowers collected a little over $330 million in rewards from False Claims Act (FCA) cases.  Under the FCA, individuals who report fraud and false claims against … Continue Reading

Pregnancy discrimination: a hot topic for 2015

In the UNorton Rose Fulbright: Pregnancy Discrimination: A Hot Topic for 2015nited States, the Federal Pregnancy Discrimination Act (“PDA”) has long forbidden an employer with fifteen or more employees from pregnancy-related discrimination. 42 U.S.C. § 2000(e) et seq. Similar laws have likewise long existed in many states and cities. See, e.g., Minn. Stat. Ch. 363A (sex includes pregnancy).

But 2014 developments raised the stakes, with increased federal agency enforcement efforts, new laws, and federal guidance.

Last year started with pregnancy discrimination being a hot topic, as New York City joined the ranks of governments with robust pregnancy-discrimination laws.

As of January 30, 2014, the New York City Human … Continue Reading

Accommodating religious preferences of job applicants: EEOC vs. Abercrombie & Fitch goes to the US Supreme Court

Under Title VII, employers have a duty to reasonably accommodate the religious beliefs of applicants and employees, where it is not an undue hardship to do so. Similar to requirements under the Americans with Disabilities Act, this includes an obligation to engage in an interactive dialogue with the applicant or employee regarding the need for an accommodation.

This month, the U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral argument on a long-running religious-accommodation case brought by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC) against clothing retailer Abercrombie & Fitch. The lawsuit, which was originally filed in 2009, accuses Abercrombie of refusing to hire … Continue Reading

Must employers separate themselves from long-used separation agreement forms?

Recently, a federal judge dismissed an action the EEOC filed against CVS Pharmacy, Inc, in which the EEOC challenged several terms in CVS’s standard separation agreement. (See Mem. Op. & Order, Equal Emp’t Opportunity Comm’n v. CVS Pharmacy, Inc., No. 1:14-CV-863 (N.D. Ill. Oct. 7, 2014)). 

The EEOC asserted that the terms in CVS’s standard agreement were unlawful restraints on departing employees’ rights under Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964.

Although the dismissal marks a victory for CVS, the court’s decision offers little solace for employers concerned about the continued validity of common terms in … Continue Reading

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