Stéphane Erickson

Subscribe to all posts by Stéphane Erickson

Lancement du Guide d’information en matière de droit de l’emploi et du travail fédéral: Modifications à la partie III du Code canadien du travail qui entreront en vigueur le 1er septembre 2019

Une série de nouvelles modifications apportées à la partie III du Code canadien du travail (Code), qui entreront en vigueur le 1er septembre 2019, conféreront de nouveaux droits aux employés. Ces modifications, adoptées en vertu des projets de loi C-86 et C-63, auront des répercussions importantes sur le milieu de travail et l’entreprise de nombreux employeurs … Continue reading

Bill C-86 Receives Royal Assent: New Leaves, Greater Notices, Proactive Pay Equity & More

Bill C-86, A second Act to implement certain provisions of the budget tabled in Parliament on February 27, 2018 and other measures (the “Bill”), received Royal Assent on December 13, 2018. As noted in our previous publications on the Bill’s amendments to the Canada Labour Code (the “Code”) and the introduction of the new (proactive) … Continue reading

Le projet de loi C‑86 reçoit la sanction royale : nouveaux congés, préavis plus longs, régime proactif d’équité salariale et plus encore

Le projet de loi C‑86, la Loi no 2 portant exécution de certaines dispositions du budget déposé au Parlement le 27 février 2018 et mettant en œuvre d’autres mesures (« projet de loi »), a reçu la sanction royale le 13 décembre 2018. Comme il a été mentionné dans nos publications précédentes sur les modifications apportées au Code canadien du travail … Continue reading

Truth and Reconciliation: New Statutory Holiday Considered for Federally-regulated Workplaces

The federal government has recently publicly announced that it plans to implement one of the 94 recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission of Canada’s 2015 report, Calls to Action, or in French, Appels à l’action, which calls “upon the federal government, in collaboration with Aboriginal peoples, to establish, as a statutory holiday, a National … Continue reading

Hello, Bonjour: Parliament Set to Rethink Official Language Requirements in the Provision of Federal Services

In anticipation of the 50th anniversary of Canada’s Official Languages Act (the “OLA” or the “Act”), the Federal Government recently announced a historic $2.7 billion in funding to support Canada’s official language minority groups and promote official bilingualism from coast to coast. Specifically regarding the provision of services, the 2018 Federal Budget Plan informs that … Continue reading

Bonjour, Hello : Repenser les exigences en matière de langues officielles incombant à certains prestataires de services du ressort fédéral

À l’aube du cinquantième anniversaire de la Loi sur les langues officielles (la “LLO” ou la “Loi”), le gouvernement fédéral a annoncé un investissement sans précédent de 2,7 milliards de dollars dédié à l’épanouissement des communautés de langue officielle en situation minoritaire et à la promotion du bilinguisme officiel et ce, dans l’ensemble du pays. … Continue reading

Coming Soon: Heightened Accountability and Transparency in Federal Employment Equity

In Canada, most federally regulated employers in the private and public spheres are subject to the Employment Equity Act, or in French, la Loi sur l’équité en matière d’emploi (the “Act”). First enacted in 1986, the Act’s objective is to ensure that federally regulated employers proactively engage in equitable practices that reduce barriers and counter … Continue reading

Employeurs sous réglementation fédérale : préparez-vous, l’équité salariale proactive s’en vient

Plus tôt cette année, nous avons appris que le gouvernement fédéral allait de l’avant avec sa promesse de renouveler le régime fédéral d’équité salariale  À ce jour, le gouvernement fédéral n’a pas présenté de loi. Cependant, dans le Budget de 2018, le gouvernement a promis un régime fédéral d’équité salariale proactif concordant avec celui de … Continue reading

Employer ordered to pay $141,000 for tort of harassment and intentional infliction of mental suffering at the workplace

In a previous post on this blog, we discussed how an employer’s non-compliance with workplace harassment and violence provisions of the Occupational Health and Safety Act resulted in a $70,000 fine ordered against the employer. Recently, the Superior Court reminded employers of the importance of ensuring that a harassment-free workplace is maintained and that all … Continue reading

A new criterion for unreasonableness: The obligation for adjudicators to demonstrate their consideration of progressive discipline

In a recent decision of the Federal Court of Canada, the Court had occasion to apply the Supreme Court of Canada’s decision in Wilson v Atomic Energy of Canada ltd (Wilson) for one of the first times. In his decision, Justice Diner found that it was unreasonable for an adjudicator not to consider both the … Continue reading

Summer Dress Codes

With summer fast approaching appropriate summer dress codes are back in the spotlight. Frequent discussion takes place regarding the degree to which an employer can determine what an employee is permitted to wear. Inappropriate work attire can be problematic to deal with for employers.  What is appropriate summer work attire in a given workplace, and … Continue reading

Not on the Menu: Ontario Human Rights Commission releases findings from restaurant dress code inquiry in new report

The Ontario Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) recently released the findings from its inquiry on sexualized and gender-specific dress codes in a report entitled, Not on the Menu: Inquiry report on sexualized and gender-based dress codes in Ontario’s restaurants. A series of complaints from restaurant workers prompted the Commission to release a policy position in … Continue reading

Ontario Human Rights Tribunal: Subjective belief can trump facts

Chodha v. 1352866, 2016 HRTO 1241 demonstrates that human rights tribunals will consider an employer’s bona fide subjective belief in deciding whether the employer has provided a reasonable explanation for apparently discriminatory conduct. Indeed, the employer’s belief may take precedence over factual circumstances, as they did in this case. The case involved the termination of … Continue reading

An Employer’s Limited Access to Medical Documentation for Accommodation Requests

In a policy statement released early last month, the Ontario Human Rights Commission (the “Commission”) clarified its position on the scope of medical documentation that employees need to provide when making disability-related accommodation requests to their employers. The policy statement supplements the existing Policy on Ableism and Discrimination Based on Disability, and reminds employers that … Continue reading

New bill proposes accommodation and paid leave for employees facing domestic violence

December 6th marked Canada’s National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women and Girls. Recent studies suggest that 54% of domestic and sexual violence victims have faced abuse at or near their workplace, placing significant stressors on performance, attendance, and mental health. Employers also feel the effects of domestic violence. Statistics Canada has … Continue reading

Youth and Employment Standards in Ontario

For many employers the beginning of the crisp autumn air is inextricably linked with the start of the new school year, and with it the return of their student employees. It is important for employers to know that while the Employment Standards Act, 2000 applies to youth and adults alike, there are some differences in … Continue reading

Employers entitled to Reasonable Notice

The B.C. Court of Appeal recently gave employers a much-needed reminder: they’re entitled to reasonable notice too. While most employees are familiar with the fact that they are entitled to reasonable notice if they’re terminated without cause, employers sometimes forget that the obligation works both ways. An employee cannot simply stop showing up to work … Continue reading

Wilson v. AECL – Generosity is Not Enough: Federally Regulated Employers Must Have Cause to Dismiss Non-Unionized Employees

At common law, a non-unionized employee can be dismissed without reasons if he or she is given reasonable notice or pay in lieu.  Today, a majority of the Supreme Court of Canada ruled that this common law rule does not apply to federally regulated employers.  The Court ruled that federally regulated employers must always provide … Continue reading

Parliament takes on pay equity in the workplace

On Wednesday, February 3, 2016, the House of Commons adopted a motion forming a new Special Committee on Pay Equity (Comité spécial sur l’équité salariale in French) [the “Committee”]. The motion was passed with 224 votes in favour and 91 against. The Committee’s mandate includes, but is not limited to, taking legislative action to address … Continue reading

New Considerations for Public Sector Employers

The Supreme Court of Canada recently rendered its decision in Commission scolaire de Laval v. Syndicat de l’enseignement de la région de Laval, 2016 SCC 8, which clarified two important legal points for public sector employers. First, the Court rejected the notion that a public sector committee that makes disciplinary decisions can refuse to provide … Continue reading

Should employers go to jail for genetic discrimination?

Bill S-201, An Act to prohibit and prevent genetic discrimination, is currently being reviewed and debated by the Senate Standing Committee on Human Rights. If passed, this Bill would impose quasi-criminal sanctions for genetic discrimination in the workplace, meaning that employers could face significant penalties in the future, including imprisonment. While the principle behind this … Continue reading
LexBlog